SpaceX CRS-17: What's On Board?

Will Smoot

May 2, 2019

Filtered by Author: Will Smoot

Despite the Crew Dragon anomaly which figuratively rocked the Space Coast in late April, SpaceX and NASA are pushing ahead with the CRS-17 flight, citing confidence in the cargo Dragon (or Dragon 1) spacecraft. CRS-17 will re-use a previously flown cargo Dragon, which last visited the International Space Station during CRS-12 in 2017.

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NG-11 Launches from Virginia's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport.  Photo credit: Jared Haworth / We Report Space

NG-11 Payload Preview: BioNutrients

Almost everyone know if you put yeast with the correct ingredients you can make bread, or wine or beer. Have you ever thought about making vitamins, or even medicine? This is the focus of the BioNutrients experiment, carried to the International Space Station aboard Cygnus during the NG-11 mission.

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With seagrass waving in the shore breeze, Antares lifts off from Launchpad 0A at the Mid Atlantic Regional Spaceport, Wallops Island, Virginia.  Photo credit: Jared Haworth / We Report Space

Northrop Grumman Launches Antares, Completes CRS-1 Contract with NG-11 Liftoff

Northrop Grumman closes out their participation in the CRS-1 contract with a beautiful, mid-afternoon launch from Virginia's Eastern Shore.

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A sample ThinSat from Twiggs Space Lab.  The green portion at the bottom is common to all the ThinSats, while the blue upper portion is used for student-designed experiments.  Photo credit: Jared Haworth / We Report Space

What's On Board NG-11?

NG-11 is Northrop Grumman's last Cargo Resupply Mission . . . of the first series that is. So that makes NG-11 the end that is in the middle. The Antares rocket slated for NG-12 is already in the HIF (Horizontal Integration Facility) and mission components are being finalized for the next launch in October.

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Tom Hoffman, InSight Project Manager, NASA JPL, left, and Sue Smrekar, InSight deputy principal investigator, NASA JPL, react after receiving confirmation that the Mars InSight lander successfully touched down on the surface of Mars, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018 inside the Mission Support Area at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. InSight, short for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, is a Mars lander designed to study the "inner space" of Mars: its crust, mantle, and core. 
Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

NASA's InSight Lander Successfully Touches Down on Mars

November 26, 2018 at 2:54 PM Eastern Standard Time JPL reported InSight was on the ground at Elysium Planitia.

For approximately one hour Monday, a number of members of the EDL Team (Entry, Descent, Landing) provided insights and commentary about the landing of InSight Mars Landing.

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